Monthly Archives: December 2012

Final papers in JCI Special Issue on Open Data

Earlier this year I blogged about the first release of papers on Open Data in a Special Issue of the Journal of Community Informatics that I had been co-editing with Zainab Bawa. A few days ago we added the last few papers to the issue, finalising it as a collection of critical thinking about the development of Open Government Data.

You can find the full table of contents below (new papers noted with (New)).

Table of Contents

Editorial

The Promises and Perils of Open Government Data (OGD), Tim G. Davies, Zainab Ashraf Bawa

Two Worlds of Open Government Data: Getting the Lowdown on Public Toilets in Chennai and Other Matters, Michael Gurstein

Articles

The Rhetoric of Transparency and its Reality: Transparent Territories, Opaque Power and Empowerment, Bhuvaneswari Raman

“This is what modern deregulation looks like” : co-optation and contestation in the shaping of the UK’s Open Government Data Initiative, Jo Bates

Data Template For District Economic Planning, Sharadini Rath

Guidelines for Designing Deliberative Digital Habitats: Learning from e-Participation for Open Data Initiatives, Fiorella De Cindio

(New) Unintended Behavioural Consequences of Publishing Performance Data: Is More Always Better?, Simon McGinnes, Kasturi Muthu Elandy

(New) Open Government Data and the Right to Information: Opportunities and Obstacles, Katleen Janssen

Notes from the field

Mapping the Tso Kar basin in Ladakh, Shashank Srinivasan

Collecting data in Chennai City and the limits of openness, Nithya V Raman

Apps For Amsterdam, Tom Demeyer

Open Data – what the citizens really want, Wolfgang Both

(New) Trustworthy Records and Open Data, Anne Catherine Thurston

(New) Exploring the politics of Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) in the context of contemporary South Africa; how are open policies implemented in practice?, Asne Kvale Handlykken

Points of View

Some Observations on the Practice of “Open Data” As Opposed to Its Promise, Roland J. Cole

How might open data contribute to good governance?

[Summary: sharing an introductory article on open data and governance]

Thanks to an invite via the the great folk at CYEC, earlier this year I was asked to write a contribution for the Commonwealth Governance Handbook around emerging technology trends, so I put down a few thoughts on how open data might contribute to good governance in a Commonwealth context. The book isn’t quite out yet, but as I’m preparing for the next few days I’ll be spending at an IDRC Information and Networks workshop with lots of open access advocates, talking about open data and governance, I thought I should at least get a pre-print uploaded. So here is the PDF for download.

The article starts:

Access to information is increasingly recognised as a fundamental component of good governance. Citizens need access to information on the decision-making processes of government, and on the performance of the state to be able to hold governments to account.

And ends by saying:

Whether open data initiatives will fully live up to high expectations many have for them remains to be seen. However, it is likely that open data will come to play a part in the governance landscape across many Commonwealth countries in coming years, and indeed, could provide a much needed tool to increase the transparency of Commonwealth institutions. Good governance, pro-social and civic outcomes of open data are not inevitable, but with critical attention they can be realised?.

The bit in-between tries to provide a short introduction to open data for beginners, and to consider some of the ways open data and governance meet, drawing particular on examples from the Commonwealth.

Comments and feedback welcome.

Download paper: PDF (128Kb)